Tag Archives: Choice

Try Something Different

From Volume 13, Issue 1:I believe we are all habitual beings. That is to say that we pretty much do the same thing in response to things that happen in our lives over and over again.

I’ve decided I want to be happy.

From Volume 13, Issue 1:I now realize that being angry, frustrated, sad, guilty, afraid, scared, annoyed, disappointed, discouraged, apathetic—the laundry list goes on—simply has not been good for my well-being. It can make me lash out at those who may or may not be responsible for these feelings. Generally it makes me very unapproachable… people walk wide circles around me.

Perception and Reality

From Volume 12, Issue 10:Pure science, it is said, is always looking for errors in its interpretations.
When I was a youngster, Pluto was a planet, and the atom was the smallest particle.
In the 15th century, the Earth was both flat and the center of the universe.

Moment of Clarity, April 2019, ….Not in Kansas anymore…..

Savor the moment

From Volume 12, Issue 1: “Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom.” This quote, oft used by productivity guru and Seven Habits author Steven Covey, are actually the words of Viktor Frankl.

What does work–life balance mean?

In recent weeks the theme of work–life balance has popped up in my conversations a little more than normal. Perhaps it’s an indication that people are being asked to do more with less (e.g., add hours to their work week to save the company from employing more people). Perhaps someone is being promoted to a […]

The 2016 Election: An Opportunity for Change

From Volume 9, Issue 11:Some of us have been witness to some disappointing events this fall. The not-so-hapless Chicago Cubs won their first World Series in 108 years (disappointing to non-fans). A reality TV star with billions rushed headlong through the Clinton machine to win an election no one though he could just days before the polls closed (disappointing for many). And now I’m hearing nonacceptance. “The Cubs are not my world champions.” “Donald Trump is not my president.” But by condemning this year’s election process and its results (or the Cubs and their fans), I believe the protestors oppress not only the winners, but themselves as well.

The Risk of Doing Nothing

From Volume 9, Issue 2:Fight, flight, or freeze. Some thugs pursued a friend and me on South Street in Morristown, NJ, in my early teenage years. We picked flight and dove into a store owned by a friend of my uncle. Adrenaline flowed. Blood pressure went up. Fear is an incredible motivator! But how do we use these three reactions in everyday life to benefit us?

Happy 2016?

From Volume 9, Issue 1:The cultural Knower/Judger rule, at least here in the Western world, is that we continually strive to close the gap between what we have or are, and what we want or want to be. The desire to close this gap is a motivator. It’s what will help you make a higher salary or annual income this year, hit your sales goals, and get the car, house, or clothes you want. But let’s face it. The driving force of the American Dream is a certain level of dissatisfaction and, quite naturally, unhappiness—until you get what you want. My question is this: do dissatisfaction and unhappiness have to go together?

Is Anyone in the Driver’s Seat?

From Volume 8, Issue 12:When I was first getting into rallying and cars in general, a mentor of mine (some readers may remember Wayne Wiley, may he rest in peace) had a pet peeve. He would come unglued anytime someone talking about an automobile accident said, “The car veered off the road.” “Nonsense!” Wayne would bellow. “The car didn’t veer off the road, the driver drove it off.” Blaming the car is a way to make a victim out of the driver, and I think it’s time to put accountability where it belongs.