April 25, 2024

The significance of insignificance

From Volume 16, Issue 1: “We are completely insignificant in the universe—except to each other, now.” (Borrowed from a movie and revised slightly by me.)

We may look at the smallest creatures—insects, perhaps—as insignificant. I can either assertively or accidentally step on one, thus disrupting a genetic chain. He or she will have no prodigy, and I did that!

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Permission

From Volume 16, Issue 3: It’s virtually impossible for me to learn something (add or change a belief, initiate or learn a skill, etc.) when I believe I know the subject matter. Almost inevitably I will take the information that someone is trying to teach me and compare it against what I already know. And then, with no motivation to do otherwise, I’ll discount it, or even argue with it either covertly or overtly.

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Intentionality

From Volume 15, Issue 4:Intention (noun):

1. the fact or quality of being done on purpose or with intent: The author’s choice here may not have been intentionally racially charged, but discrimination and prejudice are often not rooted in intentionality.

2. an attitude of purposefulness, with a commitment to deliberate action: “Active hope” is a practice that does not require optimism; instead, it requires intentionality.

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There’s more to the K/J vs L/R

From Volume 15, Issue 3:Knower/Judger vs Learner/Researcher: Part 2

Last month I used the terms “role” and “soul” to help clarify the difference between being in my K/J state and my L/R state. My “role” is the life script I’m executing, with all its goals and achievements that I can feel good or bad about hitting or not hitting. My “soul” are the untethered “think-out-of-the-box” parts of me that live in my thoughts and dreams… and sometimes run afoul of my role(s).

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Knower/Judger vs. Learner/Researcher

From Volume 15, Issue 2:Over the years, I’ve used the phrase “Knower/Judger” (or K/J) to describe a classification of behaviors rooted in, and learned from, our history and traditions. I’ve also used the phrase Learner/Researcher (or L/R) to describe us when we set judgement aside and open learned narratives (knowledge) to other interpretations. You can click on either of those phrases above to see deeper definitions.

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